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  • Writer's pictureKathie Hartmans

Really? Using Paper is Okay!


U.S. net forestland increased by 18 million acres between 1990 and 2020, despite deforestation driven by rapidly expanding urban development and climate change. The good news is--68% of paper and paper-based packaging gets recycled, and the recovery rate for corrugated cardboard stands at an amazing 91%.


“The fact is that sustainably produced North American paper products are not a cause of deforestation, no matter what some ENGO (Environmental Non-governmental Organization) members say or how many times they say it,” said Kathi Rowzie, President of Two Sides North America.


Deforestation is defined by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) as the permanent conversion of forestland to non-forest uses—like for the 2,500 residential development being built three miles down the road from your home.


The Global Forest Resources Assessment is a comprehensive report on the status of the world’s forests. From 1990 to 2020, the rate of net forest loss decreased substantially. This loss was due to reduced deforestation and increased forest areas through afforestation. Simply put, this means planting trees on land that has yet to be covered with forest.


And guess what? Because forests remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, as trees grow, they store carbon for long periods, which counts as carbon removal. Who would have figured?


U.S. net forestland increased by 18 million acres between 1990 and 2020, despite deforestation driven by rapidly expanding urban development and climate change.


The annual increase in U.S. tree volume is roughly twice the amount harvested (U.S. Forest Service, USFS) thanks to the sustainable forestry practices advocated by the print, paper, and forest products industries.


We agree that recycling as much paper as possible is a desirable environmental goal, as it is critical to a more sustainable economy. And the good news is--68% of paper and paper-based packaging gets recycled, and the recovery rate for corrugated cardboard stands at an amazing 91%.


Paper is recycled approximately five to seven times before its wood fibers become too weak to bond into new products—so increasing forest areas through afforestation (planting more trees) is an idea we can support wholeheartedly!


Those who propose that wood fiber (paper) be simply replaced with non-wood alternatives as a one-size-fits-all solution to deforestation and climate change need to look at the science and economics of paper making!


SOURCE: http://bit.ly/40rgPXR Facts are Stubborn Things: The Truth About Paper and Deforestation




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